Chapter 2 Long Descriptions

Figure 2-1: Average Annual Labour Productivity Growth in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Economies, 2001–2011

This vertical bar graph compares the percentage of average annual labour productivity growth in 35 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development economies between 2001 and 2011. Of the 35 countries, Korea had the highest annual labour productivity growth in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development economies at 4.5 percent, followed by Estonia and the Russian Federation both at 3.9 percent. Canada was 28th out of the 35 countries studied at 0.86 percent. Luxembourg had the lowest percentage of average annual labour productivity growth at minus 0.04 percent, with Italy being the next lowest at 0.1 percent.

Figure 2-2: Canada-United States Labour Productivity Comparison, 2000 and 2010

This vertical bar graph compares Canada-United States labour productivity for 2000 and 2010 for the goods sector, which has six industries, and the services sector, which has eleven industries. Canada’s productivity is compared to the percentage of the level in the United States, which is at 100 percent. For labour productivity in the goods sector, oil and gas extraction was at 130.1 percent in 2000, but dropped down to 88.2 percent in 2010, and agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting was at 83.2 percent in 2000 and rose to 94.2 percent in 2010. Labour productivity for the services sector had administrative and waste management at 110.4 percent in 2000, but it dropped down to 83.3 percent in 2010. Transportation and warehousing was at 96.6 percent in 2000 and 88.7 percent in 2010.

Figure 2-3: Canada-United States Multifactor Productivity Comparison, 2000 and 2010

This vertical bar graph compares Canada-United States multifactor productivity for 2000 and 2010 for the goods sector, which has six industries, and the services sector, which has eleven industries. Canada’s productivity is compared to the percentage of the level in the United States, which is at 100 percent. For multifactor productivity in the goods sector, oil and gas extraction was at 136.2 percent in 2000, but dropped down to 93.5 percent in 2010, and construction was at 76.5 percent in 2000 and rose to 98.2 percent in 2010. Multifactor productivity for the services sector had administrative and waste management at 131.8 percent in 2000, but it dropped down to 95.1 percent in 2010. Transportation and warehousing was at 93.3 percent in 2000 and 82.5 percent in 2010.

Figure 2-4: Labour Productivity (2010) and Labour Productivity Growth (2000-10) by Industry

This vertical bar graph compares labour productivity levels in 2010 in Canadian 2002 dollars against labour productivity growth as a percentage per year for 2000 to 2010 for the goods sector, which has six industries, and the services sector, which has eleven industries. The labour productivity level for 2010 was highest in the goods sector for oil and gas extraction at 284.2, followed by utilities at 130.2. The lowest productivity levels were in the services sector at 15 for accommodation and food services and 18.1 for other services (except government). Labour productivity growth as a percentage per year for 2000 to 2010 saw the highest growth in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting at 3.8 percent and wholesale trade at 3.2 percent. The weighted average was 35.9 for labour productivity level and 0.7 percent for labour productivity growth.